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Tommy Thompson Trail

Puget Sound and Islands

Location

Puget Sound and Islands -- Bellingham Area
View map below

Length

6.6 miles, roundtrip

Elevation

Highest Point: 25 ft.

Rating

3.67 out of 5

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Parking Pass/Entry Fee

None
 
 

This hike is a flat 3.3 mile one way blacktop trail that starts at The Port of Anacortes and ends at March Point near The Shell and Tesoro Refineries. The trail has great views of Mount Baker, Fidalgo Bay and lots of blue heron, especially when the tides are low.

Rarely do hikers have the opportunity to walk across a magnificent bay on an abandoned railroad trestle. This paved rail trail is an easy walk year round. It is ADA accessible for wheel chairs and strollers. Keep an eye out for marine life. You may see a sea lion staring back at you as you stroll across the trestle connecting the eastern and western shores of Fidalgo Bay.

The Tommy Thompson Trail starts at the intersection of 11th Avenue and Q Street in Anacortes. The blacktop heads south along Q Avenue. After 7 blocks, the trail heads diagonally east and the street changes names to R Avenue. After 0.6 mile, the trail passes the access point at the intersection of 22nd Street and R Avenue. There is a restroom here.

Heading south again, the trail passes a public restroom at 30th Avenue. In another 0.7 mile from 22nd Avenue, the trail reaches 34th Street. Continuing south, the traverse the western shore of Fidalgo Bay. Looking across the bay on a clear day, there are views of Mount Baker on the distant eastern horizon.

After another mile from 34th Street, the trail passes an RV park. A majestic totem pole stands next to the trail. After crossing Weaverling Road at the RV park, there is an ADA accessible port-a-potty next to the blacktop. Beyond the RV park, the trail heads in a southeasterly direction and crosses Fidalgo Bay on a rocky causeway and then a wooden trestle.

Your turnaround point is March Point Road on the eastern shore of Fidalgo Bay. The trail crosses an additional mile between the RV Park and March Point Road.

Historical Note:

So just who was Tommy Thompson? Actually, there were two, father and son. The father was a distinguished oceanographer, the son - who was the railroad buff - a local mechanical engineer. This article

  https://www.anacortesnow.com/news/community-news/2834-two-tommy-thompsons

in Anacortes Now (June 3, 2014) offers a very readable account of their lives.

 

Tommy Thompson Trail

Map & Directions

Trailhead
Co-ordinates: 48.4802, -122.5813 Open map in new window

Trailhead

Puget Sound and Islands -- Bellingham Area

City of Anacortes

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Getting There

From I-5 north or south get off at the Burlington exit 230 at Highway 20 and head west towards the City of Anacortes for 11.7 miles. Where Highway 20 forks, stay on the right road onto the Highway 20 spur road for another 2.5 miles into Anacortes. Turn right on R Avenue.

There are multiple access points to start your walk. After turning right onto R Avenue in Anacortes, the access points are listed from the south to north along R Avenue and (after the road changes names) Q Avenue. The southern-most access point is on 30th Avenue. Turn right on 30th Street from R Avenue. In about one half block and beyond a pedestrian crossing, there is parking and a public restroom on the right side of 30th Avenue. There is no sign on 30th Avenue for this trail access point.

The next access point is at the intersection of 22nd Street and R Avenue. Just north of the roundabout, take the first right and then another right turn into the parking area with a restroom. There is no sign on R Avenue for this access point.

The northern access point is at the intersection of 11th Street and Q Avenue. Just east of this intersection is parking at the Port of Anacortes.

Parking Pass/Entry Fee

None
 

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Tommy Thompson Trail

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