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Hiking Guide

WTA's hiking guide is the most comprehensive database of hikes in Washington, and comprises content written by local hiking experts and user submitted information. All data is vetted by WTA staff. This resource is made possible by the donations of WTA members.

We respectfully acknowledge the lands we are visiting are the homelands of Indigenous tribes of the Pacific Northwest, some of whom have reserved treaty rights on these lands. Tribes continue to rely on and share in the management of these lands today. Please tread gently and treat these places with respect.

Results List

156 Hikes

Olympic Peninsula -- Pacific Coast

 
6.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 150 ft.
Highest Point: 100 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.12
(8 votes)
A beautiful hike through an interesting forest, often over boardwalks, ends at the beach with the potential for birdwatching and wildlife viewing. If you plan ahead and get a permit, it's a nice overnight destination.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula -- Northern Coast

 
4.25 miles, one-way
Gain: 50 ft.
Highest Point: 10 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
2.25
(4 votes)
An easy, mostly paved hike along the saltwater, with plenty of chances to see wildlife.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula -- Hood Canal

 
11.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 3489 ft.
Highest Point: 6000 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.47
(72 votes)
Marmot Pass offers great views and a gentle hike through old-growth forest as well as high meadows. It is a great day hike, but also offers a great starting place for a variety of overnight options.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula -- Northern Coast

 
4.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 10 ft.
Highest Point: 10 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.00
(1 vote)
An easy, pleasant four-season ramble along the Dungeness River, good for bird watching.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula -- Northern Coast

 
2.5 miles, roundtrip
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
An interpretive trail outside of Forks. Great for a midday walk or a leg stretch during a long drive.
 
 
 
1.3 miles, roundtrip
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
A one-mile loop through forest and along the East Fork of the Satsop River. A cutoff trail allows this hike to be made even shorter, if desired.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula -- Kitsap Peninsula

 
1.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 328 ft.
Highest Point: 362 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
A short trail through undeveloped state park lands to a section of shoreline on the Key Peninsula.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula -- Hood Canal

 
9.0 miles of trails
Gain: 250 ft.
Highest Point: 450 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.75
(4 votes)
Gibbs Lake sits tucked away in the Northeast corner of the Olympic Peninsula. This county park comes complete with its namesake lake and an intersecting system of trails that are open to hikers, mountain bikers and horseback riders.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula -- Kitsap Peninsula

 
2.7 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 210 ft.
Highest Point: 530 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.00
(2 votes)
Explore an undeveloped watershed on well-maintained trails just minutes from town.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula -- Pacific Coast

 
6.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 500 ft.
Highest Point: 650 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.12
(8 votes)
Take a short but very scenic hike starting from the Altair campground in Olympic National Park. Traverse along the edge of the Elwha River, recently free-flowing thanks to the removal of the Glines Canyon Dam.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula -- Olympia

 
1.98 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 200 ft.
Highest Point: 225 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.00
(6 votes)
Take a short jaunt in Tolmie State Park. Great for families or just a quick stretch of the legs.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula -- Pacific Coast

 
26.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 3700 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.41
(29 votes)
The famed Enchanted Valley chalet has been a destination for weary travelers since the early '30s, when it provided a mountain retreat for hikers and horseback riders. During World War II, the chalet served as an Aircraft Warning Station, and is currently listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It's occasionally used as an emergency shelter and ranger station, but the precarious position over the Quinault River has caused it to be closed to hikers until it is moved.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula -- Pacific Coast

 
0.8 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 100 ft.
Highest Point: 600 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.48
(21 votes)
A short rainforest loop from the Hoh Rain Forest Visitor Center in Olympic National Park.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula -- Olympia

 
3.5 miles of trails
Rating:
Average rating:
3.27
(11 votes)
With five miles of shoreline in South Puget Sound, the Woodard Bay Conservation Area includes forests, wetlands of freshwater, as well as historic and cultural resources that are a valuable diversion in the area.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula -- Northern Coast

 
6.8 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 850 ft.
Highest Point: 1166 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.43
(14 votes)
Visit a park full of coastal scenery, forests, rocky bluffs, tidepools, and a hearty climb to a 1,166-foot viewpoint. Hike though beautiful coastal forest to an expansive view north across the Strait of Juan de Fuca to Vancouver Island and Salt Spring Island in Canada.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula -- Kitsap Peninsula

 
10.0 miles of trails
Rating:
Average rating:
3.00
(2 votes)
North Kitsap Heritage Park is a small collection of trails supported locally through land trusts. Trails here range from steep to flat and go through sunny meadows and forests.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula -- Kitsap Peninsula

 
13.0 miles of trails
Gain: 250 ft.
Highest Point: 350 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.00
(4 votes)
This little gem of a park is located in Kitsap County, at the west end of Newberry Hill Road right before the T to Seabeck Highway.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula -- Kitsap Peninsula

 
1.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 25 ft.
Highest Point: 25 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.60
(5 votes)
This is an easy loop trail, wandering nearly one mile through a forest of bigleaf maple and cedars on the shores of Carr Inlet in Gig Harbor. With less than fifty feet of elevation gain and plenty of picnic tables, it makes the perfect destination for families with small children.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula -- Pacific Coast

 
0.8 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 20 ft.
Highest Point: 25 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
If the tide is high, or you just want to see a different side of the Olympic Peninsula while you're visiting the coast, cross Highway 101 from the Kalaloch campground and take a peek into the deep Olympic forest.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula -- Kitsap Peninsula

 
2.6 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 100 ft.
Highest Point: 180 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.75
(4 votes)
Providing a cool forest walk even on warm summer day, Hansville Greenway is an extensive network of trails encompassing the community of Hansville on the Kitsap peninsula.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula -- Kitsap Peninsula

 
2.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 360 ft.
Highest Point: 360 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.18
(17 votes)
Enjoy breath taking views of the Olympics from a secluded cove with many different types of seabirds and wildlife. Try to keep your feet dry while exploring a series of trails amid the historic 184-acre Guillemot Cove Nature Reserve.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula -- Hood Canal

 
5.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1100 ft.
Highest Point: 2540 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.73
(11 votes)
This is a classic Olympics river hike without the crowds, and it's downhill all the way to your destination.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula -- Hood Canal

 
4.9 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 400 ft.
Highest Point: 1200 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
2.40
(5 votes)
This hiker-only trail makes for a quick way to sample the ecosystem on the east slope of the Olympic mountains. Plus, it's a decent starter backpacking trip for kids and makes for a nice day for birdwatchers.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula -- Hood Canal

 
6.8 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 600 ft.
Highest Point: 3100 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.36
(11 votes)
The Upper Dungeness River trail is an easy stroll along a roaring river and among towering trees. It’s great for all ages (as long as the trail is snow- and ice-free), and the shelter at Camp Handy is a welcome and dry lunch destination on rainy days.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula -- Hood Canal

 
6.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 800 ft.
Highest Point: 1600 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
2.67
(6 votes)
Climb through second-growth forest to a not-so-dry creek, while enjoying spring wildflowers and views of nearby Lake Cushman and surrounding peaks.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula -- Hood Canal

 
13.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1200 ft.
Highest Point: 1550 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.06
(17 votes)
The Dosewallips River Road is the gateway to the eastern Olympic Mountains and it penetrates one of the deepest canyons in Olympic National Park. Now closed to vehicles, the old road bed allows hikers to explore true wilderness at a gentle grade. Backpackers, peak baggers, and horseback riders take advantage of the easy access to the trails beyond the road's end.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula -- Kitsap Peninsula

 
2.0 miles, roundtrip
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
This 66-acre preserve sits on the shores of the Kitsap Peninsula overlooking the Hood Canal. There are about 2 miles of trails to wander.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula -- Hood Canal

 
3.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 400 ft.
Highest Point: 425 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
2.91
(11 votes)
The 3.5 mile Steam Donkey Loop Trail is an especially good choice in spring, with lots of creeklets, views of the Dosewallips River and silent forest. There is a strong chance that you will see wildlife in winter and spring. An elk herd resides in the area, and with the estuary so close, the area is rife with bird-life. As an added bonus for fall hikers, you can search for and pick chanterelle mushrooms.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula -- Hood Canal

 
5.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 800 ft.
Highest Point: 930 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
0.00
(0 votes)
There is one section of the Lake Wynoochee Lakeshore Trail that can be hiked year-round—a pleasant, interesting hike for all ages, at 6 miles round-trip and 800 feet of elevation gain. Its creeks have bridges; it has road access at both ends; it features flowers in spring and summer, autumn color in fall, and provides a pleasant winter outing in clear weather.
 
 

Olympic Peninsula -- Pacific Coast

 
1.5 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 200 ft.
Highest Point: 250 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
4.33
(48 votes)
Trail closed until at least January 1 2022
The furthest northwest tip of the contiguous United State, Cape Flattery provides a dramatic backdrop to a surprisingly accessible hike. It's managed by the Makah Tribe, who provide permits for parking here at Washburn's General Store, The Makah Museum, and many other locations in Neah Bay. As you drive through on the way to the trailhead, be sure to purchase yours -- they're good for the year, and you can also use it for Shi Shi Beach.