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Print-Your-Own: New Northwest Forest Pass Option

Beginning this month, hikers can purchase and print a day pass for trailheads where you need a Northwest Forest Pass. It's a convenient option for spur-of-the-moment adventures on trails in Washington's National Forests, from Mount Baker to Mount Adams.

Beginning this month, hikers can purchase and print a day pass for trailheads where you need a Northwest Forest Pass. The e-Pass is a new, convenient option for spur-of-the-moment adventures on trails in Washington's National Forests, from Umatilla National Forest to Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie.

All Forest Service trailheads in Washington and Oregon with developed facilities (restrooms and trash cans that need to be serviced, picnic tables, etc.) require a pass. This includes most trailheads in the Cascades and Olympics. (See a map and list of the public lands covered by the pass.)

How the new e-Pass day pass option works: purchase, print and go

  1. Purchase the pass online. You will need your car's license plate number and the date you plan to hike. (The form will also ask you which forest you area hiking in, but you can change your mind about where you plan to hike after you print it)
  2. Print the pass within 2 days.
  3. Display your pass at the trailhead.

Note: The e-Pass print option currently only applies to single day passes, not to annual passes.

    Other pass options: an annual pass, earn a pass with trail work

    Annual pass: If you plan to hike on trails in National Forest lands more than once, you may want to consider purchasing an annual Northwest Forest Pass for $30. The pass is available at National Forest offices and visitor centers and via private vendors or online.

    Volunteer to earn a pass: Volunteers who do trail work on Northwest Forest lands with WTA can receive an annual Northwest Forest Pass by volunteering for 2 days of trail work.

    Where the fees go: With massive cuts to the federal budgets of National Forests over the last decade, the fees collected by the Northwest Forest pass help support basic services that keep our beloved trails clear and enjoyable to hike, including: trail maintenance, rangers, trailhead security, and restroom and trash upkeep.

    Bookmark these pages on passes

    Because we have a wealth of public lands managed by different state and federal agencies, the passes, fees and regulations can get confusing. In the links below, we run down all of the various recreation passes for national parks, forests and state lands—from the Northwest Forest Pass to Washington's Discover Pass. Additional information for specific trailheads can be found on many of our Hiking Guide entries.

     

    Comments

    Northwest forest pass

    Day use fees or annual passes are not required in the majority of the Colville National Forest. They may not even require it anymore in the Salmo Priest wilderness area due to lack of enforcement capabilities. All trail along the Kettle Crest do not require any fees. Also if you wish to camp for free try the Little Pend Oreille National Wildlife Refuge. There is also no fee to enter or hike in the LPONWR.

    Posted by:


    "HighlandsDan" on Apr 17, 2014 08:53 AM